NewsTHE HAITIAN REVOLUTION WASN’T THE ONLY REVOLT OF ENSLAVED PEOPLE

THE HAITIAN REVOLUTION WASN’T THE ONLY REVOLT OF ENSLAVED PEOPLE

Here are seven memorable slave rebellions that took place in the United States.

The Haitian Revolution was a pivotal moment in world history and is considered one of the most successful revolts featuring enslaved people in the world. However, it is not the only one. Below is a list of seven revolts and their lasting impacts.

1. The Stono Rebellion of 1739

2. The Zanj Rebellion of 869 A.D.

3. The German Coast Uprising of 1811 

Orchestrated by Charles Deslondes, this insurrection involved approximately 25 enslaved people who attacked the owner of the Andry plantation as well as his family. Though the abolitionists successfully killed one of the plantation owner’s sons, the owner was allowed to live. The enslaved then took over the plantation, which was equipped with military weapons. Now armed, they marched toward New Orleans with plans to capture the city. Soon after, however, they were met with military forces. Two days into the battle, the rebels ran out of ammunition. The rebellion was crushed and, while some insurgents escaped, others were arrested and executed to deter future revolts.

4. Nat Turner’s Rebellion 

5. The Amistad Mutiny of 1839

6. Harpers Ferry Raid

On Oct. 16 in 1859, a group of abolitionists marched on Harpers Ferry in Virginia, according to Brittnanica. Spearheaded by John Brown, the band planned to stage a rebellion and establish a haven for freed slaves across Virginia and Maryland. This integrated group encompassed 16 white people and five Black people, who took over the armory during nightfall on Oct. 16. Two days of fighting ensued; state and federal troops were eventually deployed to suppress the movement. Though the battle was short-lived and its participants were either killed in action or hanged for treason, it invigorated the anti-slavery movement in the South while sowing fear into the hearts of white slave owners. John Brown was also hailed as a symbol of martyrdom.

7. The New York Slave Revolt of 1712

While New York City was being built into what would become the most influential metropolis in the United States, enslaved people were left to bear its responsibilities. Finally, having grown tired of years of mistreatment and abuse, a group of over two dozen joined together to kill their masters on April 6, 1712. Armed with weapons, the insurrectionists killed 9 slaveowners and injured an additional six before fleeing to the north, where they were tailed by military forces. Eventually, they were caught and publicly executed for their actions but the New York Slave Revolt challenged the dominant existence of the active slave trade in the country’s most socially advanced city. 

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Source: Black Enterprise

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