NewsBlack Detroit Sees Blue Collar Boom

Black Detroit Sees Blue Collar Boom

Business is booming in Detroit as Black residents in the Motor City are driving the blue-collar boom by starting small businesses and building up their neighborhoods.

Dr. Kenneth Harris, president and CEO of the National Business League, told Michigan Chronicle half of these businesses are blue-collar industries. Dana Williams, chief strategy officer of Detroit at Work, said there has been a focus on training residents to become skilled in construction and infrastructure, an initiative driven by residents, governmental support, and community partners. 
From technology and manufacturing to renewable resources, Detroit is expanding its industries. Companies such as General Motors and Shinola are tapping into the city’s potential. The abundance of qualified workers and the the city’s geographically beneficial location are among the reasons for these companies to invest and lay roots in the city. 

However, the talented pool of skilled workers makes this diversification of industries possible.
Through the efforts of organizations like Focus: HOPE, workers can attend training programs that equip people with the skills and education required to be qualified for these jobs.

“Together with our union partners, we know that a career in the skilled trades is a solid one with many opportunities right here in our city,” said Williams. Overall, these efforts contribute to the blue-collar boom by equipping the city’s workforce with knowledge and skills, allowing for the diversification of industries here. 
Revitalizing the city through infrastructure changes such as public, residential, and commercial properties has been instrumental in attracting new businesses and investments, increasing the demand for skilled workers.

Additionally, industry leaders and government agencies have played a significant role by implementing policies to support the developing workforce and to increase investments. 
What’s happening in Detroit is part of a larger trend, The Michigan Chronicle reports. The “ongoing shedding of tech jobs” has made people reconsider manufacturing “for stability, both in terms of the duration of the work and the paycheck.” Another factor is that the Biden administration has made a concerted effort to create such wage-earning jobs in areas like infrastructure.

Source: Black Enterprise

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